Articles Comments

The WebGenre Blog: The power of genre applied to digital information. By Marina Santini » Entries tagged with "serge sharoff"

White Paper: Automatic Genre Identification – Testing with Noise

Automatic Genre Identification – Testing with Noise by Efstathios Stamatatos, Serge Sharoff, Marina Santini – Copyright © 2012, All rights reserved.   Citation:  Stamatatos E., Sharoff S., Santini M. (2012). Automatic Genre Identification – Testing with Noise. [White paper]. Retrieved from http://www.forum.santini.se/2012/03/white-paper-automatic-genre-identification-testing-with-noise/ The genre collections used in the experiments are available here. The reference list is here. In the experiments described below, genre classes coming from three genre collections have been used: Santinis7 (Santini, 2007). KI-04 (Meyer zu Eissen and Stein, 2004), and HGC (Stubbe and Ringlstetter, 2007). These genre collections have been created by different people, in different universities, for different purposes, with different criteria, and different notions of what genre is. Since genre is a complex concept and genre classes can be characterized in different ways, we assume that having a AGI algorithm … Read entire article »

Filed under: collaborative blogging, computational models, featured, signed posts, white papers

Chapter: Any Land in Sight?

Any Land in Sight? by Marina Santini, Serge Sharoff, Alexander Mehler In: Genres on the Web Computational Models and Empirical Studies Alexander Mehler, Serge Sharoff and Marina Santini Text, Speech and Language Technology Volume 42, 2011, DOI: 10.1007/978-90-481-9178-9 Abstract Is there hope of sorting out the complex issues of genre on the web? Is there any land in sight? We think so. Genre is a multifarious concept that lends itself to many interpretations and uses. For this reason, we included as many approaches and different views as possible. We believe that the plurality and diversity of visions fosters cross-fertilisation of ideas and that inter- and transdisciplinarity are the most productive approaches to increasing our understanding of this important concept. … Read entire article »

Filed under: chapters

Abstract: In the Garden and in the Jungle: Comparing Genres in the BNC and Internet

In the Garden and in the Jungle: Comparing Genres in the BNC and Internet by Serge Sharoff In: Genres on the Web Computational Models and Empirical Studies Alexander Mehler, Serge Sharoff and Marina Santini Text, Speech and Language Technology Volume 42, 2011, DOI: 10.1007/978-90-481-9178-9 Abstract In this chapter I will present an approach to classifying the Web into genres. The goal is to have a compact system of categories that can be assigned with little ambiguity to almost every webpage. The proposed typology is organised from the functional viewpoint: generalised categories for genre classification correspond to major aims of text production, such as `discussion’ or `instruction’. This chapter compares the genre distributions in English and Russian automatically constructed Internet corpora against their human-collected counterparts (BNC and RNC) in terms of these classes using probabilistic classifiers. … Read entire article »

Filed under: abstracts

Chapter Excerpt: Riding the Rough Waves of Genre on the Web

Riding the Rough Waves of Genre on the Web Concepts and Research Questions Marina Santini, Alexander Mehler, Serge Sharoff In: Genres on the Web Computational Models and Empirical Studies Alexander Mehler, Serge Sharoff and Marina Santini Text, Speech and Language Technology Volume 42, 2011, DOI: 10.1007/978-90-481-9178-9 1 Why is Genre Important? Genre, in the most generic definition, takes the meaning “kind; sort; style” (OED). A more specialised definition of genre in OED reads: “A particular style or category of works of art; esp. a type of literary work characterised by a particular form, style, or purpose.”. Similar definitions are found in other dictionaries, for instance, OALD reads “a particular type or style of literature, art, film or music that you can recognise because of its special features”. Broadly speaking, then, generalising from lexicographic definitions, genre can be seen … Read entire article »

Filed under: chapter excerpts