The WebGenre Blog: The power of genre applied to digital information. By Marina Santini » Entries tagged with "genre"

Book Chapter: Genre and Terminology by Margaret Rogers (2000)

Useful insights about the relation between domain-specific lexicons and the corpus-driven approach to terminology Genre and Terminology by Margaret Rogers Chapter in: Analysing Professional Genres Edited by Anna Trosborg, John Benjamins [Pragmatics & Beyond New Series 74] 2000 Googlebook: … Read entire article »

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Opinion Retrieval and Ranking: the creeping and ineluctable force of Genre

Last Updated: 27 May 2013 Two fundamental principles concurring to the definition and characterization of the concept of genre are conventions and expectations. Simply put, in textual (written or spoken) communication, genres are words that connote different types of text. For instance, on the web the home page genre is different from the blog genre; in a company, the minutes genre is different from the white paper genre; in the press the leader genre is different from the letter to the editor genre… Genres have the power of shaping information following rhetorical and discourse patterns that have become conventionalized. Genre conventions are implemented by the writer(s). When acknowledged, genre conventions raise predictable expectations in the readers or more generally in those who “process” a text… Although I am oversimplifying here, broadly speaking … Read entire article »

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Book in Preparation: A Computational Theory of Digital Genre

Book in preparation: A Computational Theory of Digital Genre by Marina Santini The book lists, examines and develops the key concepts necessary to build a novel, intuitive and robust definition of digital genre for computational purposes. The newly proposed definition is the tenet of the computational theory underlying computational models for automatic digital genre classification. The book is divided into six parts, each one discussing exhaustively issues that have been neglected or considered to be too controvertial to find any theoretical or pragmatic agreement among scholars or researchers. The book provides not only theoretical foundations, but also a number of use cases, corpora/datasets, and computational models that readers can re-use for their own experiments to evaluate the validity of the theoretical and practical solutions proposed in this book. Preliminary Table of Contents PART … Read entire article »

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Request: Corpus-Based Sublanguage Glossary

How to build a glossary of: specialized term = common word automatically? Dear all, I wonder if you have any experience or if you can provide references on how to build automatically  a glossary from genre-specific corpora. The glossary should be made of pairs in the form of: sublangage term = common/familiar word. For instance: anemi = blood deficiency analgesic = painkiller etc. Thanks in advance for suggestions and pointers. Marina   … Read entire article »

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Dissemination: A cross-domain analysis of task and genre effects on perceptions of usefulness (2012)

A cross-domain analysis of task and genre effects on perceptions of usefulness by Luanne Freund, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada Information Processing & Management, In Press, Available online 30 October 2012   Abstract Search systems are limited by their inability to distinguish between information that is on topic and information that is useful, i.e. suitable and applicable to the tasks at hand. This paper presents the results of two studies that examine a possible approach to identifying more useful documents through the relationships between searchers’ tasks and the document genres in the collection. A questionnaire and an experimental user study conducted in two domains, provide evidence that perceptions of usefulness are dependent upon information task type, document genre, and the relationship between these two factors. Expertise is also found to have an effect on … Read entire article »

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Dissemination: Cross-Genre and Cross-Domain Detection of Semantic Uncertainty (2012)

Cross-Genre and Cross-Domain Detection of Semantic Uncertainty György Szarvas, Veronika Vincze, Richárd Farkas, György Móra, Iryna Gurevych* Computational Linguistics, June 2012, Vol. 38, No. 2, Pages 335-367   Uncertainty is an important linguistic phenomenon that is relevant in various Natural Language Processing applications, in diverse genres from medical to community generated, newswire or scientific discourse, and domains from science to humanities. The semantic uncertainty of a proposition can be identified in most cases by using a finite dictionary (i.e., lexical cues) and the key steps of uncertainty detection in an application include the steps of locating the (genre- and domain-specific) lexical cues, disambiguating them, and linking them with the units of interest for the particular application (e.g., identified events in information extraction). In this study, we focus on the genre and domain differences of … Read entire article »

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Dissemination: Stable Classification of Text Genres (2011)

Stable Classification of Text Genres Philipp Petrenz and Bonnie Webber (University of Edinburgh) Computational Linguistics, June 2011, Vol. 37, No. 2, Pages 385-393   Abstract Every text has at least one topic and at least one genre. Evidence for a text’s topic and genre comes, in part, from its lexical and syntactic features—features used in both Automatic Topic Classification and Automatic Genre Classification (AGC). Because an ideal AGC system should be stable in the face of changes in topic distribution, we assess five previously published AGC methods with respect to both performance on the same topic–genre distribution on which they were trained and stability of that performance across changes in topic–genre distribution. Our experiments lead us to conclude that (1) stability in the face of changing topical distributions should be added to the evaluation critera … Read entire article »

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Thesis Review: Emotion in Information Retrieval

Moshfeghi, Yashar (2012) Role of emotion in information retrieval PhD thesis Submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the title of Doctor of Philosophy School of Computing Science, College of Science and Engineering, University of Glasgow, UK. Thesis Download (A copy can be downloaded for personal non-commercial research or study, without prior permission or charge) Amazon UK — Amazon USA Review by Marina Santini The PhD thesis Role of emotion in information retrieval by Yashar Moshfeghi starts filling a gap in an area of Information Retrieval (IR) and Information Studies (IS) that is still underinvestigated: the role played by emotion in searchers’ behaviour. Although it is crystal clear that searchers use emotionally-rich documents from the internet to satisfy their needs — from blogs to tweets — the influence that emotion might have in information retrieval and … Read entire article »

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Thesis Review: Opinion mining and lexical affect sensing

Alexander Osherenko, Opinion mining and lexical affect sensing. Computer-aided analysis of opinions and emotions in texts. PhD thesis published by SVH, 2010 (p. 255) Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Opinion-mining-lexical-affect-sensing/dp/383812488X;Free download: http://opus.bibliothek.uni-augsburg.de/opus4/frontdoor/index/index/docId/1469 Reviewed by Marina Santini The PhD thesis “Opinion mining and lexical affect sensing” by  Alexander Osherenko contains nine chapters, six appendices and an index. The thesis presents approaches to emotion recognition from texts belonging to several emotional corpora. Four approaches are experimented and discussed in detail, namely (1) the statistical approach based on data mining techniques; (2) the semantic approach leveraging on semantic features and grammatical interdependencies; (3)  the hybrid approach that combines the statistical approach and the semantic approach; and finally (4) the multimodal-fusion that builds upon the linguistic modality and acoustic modality. … Read entire article »

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Towards a Computational Theory of Digital Genre (I): Working Definition of Genres for Computational Purposes

Towards a Computational Theory of Digital Genre (I): Working Definition of Genres for Computational Purposes by Marina Santini – Last Updated: 29 Oct 2012 1. What is a (textual) genre? • A genre is a class of texts with similar communicative, textual and linguistic features. 2. What characterizes a genre? A genre: • Must have a name • Must be recognized within a community • Must be produced or retrieved during a task • Must have conventions • Must raise expectations • Can change over time. It is an cultural artifact (culture here includes society, media, techonology, etc.) 3. What characterizes a digital genre? • The same characteristics listed above. • A digital genre is any kind of genre that has a digital form, such as emails, chats, online academic papers, online newspaper articles, blogs… • A digital genre can be any paper genre … Read entire article »

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