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The WebGenre Blog: The power of genre applied to digital information. By Marina Santini » Entries tagged with "blog"

Towards a Computational Theory of Digital Genre (I): Working Definition of Genres for Computational Purposes

Towards a Computational Theory of Digital Genre (I): Working Definition of Genres for Computational Purposes by Marina Santini – Last Updated: 29 Oct 2012 1. What is a (textual) genre? • A genre is a class of texts with similar communicative, textual and linguistic features. 2. What characterizes a genre? A genre: • Must have a name • Must be recognized within a community • Must be produced or retrieved during a task • Must have conventions • Must raise expectations • Can change over time. It is an cultural artifact (culture here includes society, media, techonology, etc.) 3. What characterizes a digital genre? • The same characteristics listed above. • A digital genre is any kind of genre that has a digital form, such as emails, chats, online academic papers, online newspaper articles, blogs… • A digital genre can be any paper genre … Read entire article »

Filed under: dialectic, discussions, dissemination, reflections

Towards Language–Independent Web Genre Detection (2009)

Poster paper by : Philipp Scholl, Renato Domínguez García, Doreen Böhnstedt, Christoph Rensing, Ralf Steinmetz The term web genre denotes the type of a given web resource, in contrast to the topic of its content. In this research, we focus on recognizing the web genres blog, wiki and forum. We present a set of features that exploit the hierarchical structure of the web page’s HTML mark-up and thus, in contrast to related approaches, do not depend on a linguistic analysis of the page’s content. Our results show that it is possible to achieve a very good accuracy or a fully language independent detection of structured web genres. … Read entire article »

Filed under: abstracts

Recasting the blog as a collection of blog posts

Draft. Kathryn Grafton, Situating the public social actions of blog posts, in Janet Giltrow and Dieter Stein (eds) Genres in the Internet, John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2009. The chapter by Kathryn Grafton  focuses on the social actions of blog posts, and not on the blog as a genre. Grafton suggests reframing the blog as a collection of generic utterances. In order to situate bloggers’ social actions, she proposes studying the blog post in two contexts: (1) the blog itself and (2) the topics of the post. Merging influences from situational rhetoric, the theory of publics and the concept of uptake, Grafton argues that bloggers who write public posts about a public event participate in two situation, i.e. the blog and the event expressed by the topic of the post. Consequently, the resulting social actions … Read entire article »

Filed under: short reviews

Flogs, i.e. the subversion of the blog genre

Cornelius Puschmann, Lies at Wal-Mart, in Janet Giltrow and Dieter Stein (eds) Genres in the Internet, John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2009. The chapter by Cornelius Puschmann presents a novel and stimulating analysis of an emerging faux genre in a lively style. Cornelius in his “Lies at Wal-Mart” explores a very little investigated aspect in genre studies, i.e. genre subversion (also called genre mimicry). Genre subversion is the flouting of a genre prototype. A genre prototype can be defined as “an amalgam of formal, technical, stylistic and cultural aspects, which together form a recognizable conceptual category” (p. 58). But what are the constitutive features of a genre prototype and how can they be measured? What constitutes a good instantiation of a particular genre? Where does a particular genre start and end? As we all … Read entire article »

Filed under: reviews

Re-fusing form in genre study by Amy J. Devitt (2009) II

Continued. Amy J. Devitt, Re-fusing form in genre study, in Janet Giltrow and Dieter Stein (eds) Genres in the Internet, John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2009 … I am not sure that I completely agree on the importance of the “content”, or “substance” as a constitutive element of genre… … Read entire article »

Filed under: dialectic, reviews

Re-fusing form in genre study by Amy J. Devitt (2009) I

Amy J. Devitt, Re-fusing form in genre study, in Janet Giltrow and Dieter Stein (eds) Genres in the Internet, John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2009 The chapter Re-fusing form in genre study by Amy J. Devitt has a very clear mission: the full re-integration of the “form”, intended as linguistic form, into genre studies. In this respect, two seminal  works are re-examined under the “form” lens, namely “Genre as social action” (1984) by Carolyn Miller and “The problem of speech genres” (1981) by Mikahil Bakhtin. In both cases, Devitt points out that Miller and Bakhtin refuse formalism but not form in their definition of genre. Formalism is intended as the treatment or analysis of the form in isolation of its contexts. In particular, Miller in her article argues for the fusion of three elements, … Read entire article »

Filed under: reviews